Orientals

To find the required value. To be better in life. To help us on those occasions in which our physical forces or spiritual falter. To ensure a good catch or so let’s go unharmed. Ultimately, and as more accurate synthesis: to find a beam of light in the darkness that cover our path. Taking a line of dialogue from the film Master & Commander, on the other side of the world, I would like to offer readers insight into those gods of antiquity that mariners are entrusted and, also, to some other holy. I wanted to escape from all the Greco-Roman mythology, which so well have studied everyone in our years of school and/or college career and who has come to give name to not a few ships of the navies and merchant ships in the world. It is my desire to address these other gods and creatures which, by its remoteness or exoticism, escape to our culture, accompanying us for more than 2,500 years.

In this first article I will speak very briefly of a well known creatures of heard: the Dragons. Contrary to Western dragons, as J.R.R. Tolkien described them in the hobbit, the Orientals are benevolent, without greed or malice, but rather capricious creatures. In Chinese mythology, the dragon (lung) is owner and Lord of storms and is associated with the spirits of the water. Attributed the waterspouts of proportions cyclonic flying skyward when he acts at sea. Also undersea volcanoes. The most powerful dragons were the Kings of the seas located in the four cardinal points of the compass china, living in large underwater palaces surrounded by wealth obtained from shipwrecked reeds. In Japan the dragon is called Tatsu Ryu and is considered the God of the sea, but also of the River. This last meaning is quite logical since the dragon oriental, very sleek and agile, much resembles a river.